Dr. Tim R. Love is proud to be offering the recently FDA approved BodyTite by Inmode. BodyTite provides minimally invasive radio-frequency assisted lipolysis (RFAL). Surgical Results Without the Scars!

Watch the video above to learn more!

Why You May Want to Consider a Skin Peel

dr-love-patient-getting a-skin-peel

Have you been feeling like you need a change lately? Rejuvenate your skin and reverse sun damage with a SkinMedica skin peel. We’re pleased to announce that we now offer skin peels at Dr. Tim Love’s office.

Skin peels can help smooth the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles and roughness. A skin peel will also help with aging, sun exposure and uneven skin tone. Plus, Skin peels are eligible for Brilliant Distinction points!

SkinMedica peels come in three different strengths:

Don’t worry about determining which peel is most beneficial for you. We will evaluate your skin and recommend the appropriate peel.

Who should get a skin peel?

Anyone who wants to improve the appearance of their skin is a great candidate for skin peels. You don’t have to be a certain age or have any specific skin type or color to benefit from a skin peel.

We don’t recommend getting your first peel on the same day as a big event, because most people will experience mild peeling or, at the very least, have a red face after their first peel.

Someone who has more sun damage will need a more aggressive peel, which involves a longer process, but he or she will still see results. Those with younger skin typically get peels for maintenance and prevention. Prevention is much easier than correction, but that doesn’t mean it’s ever too late to start a positive protocol.

How do skin peels work?

SkinMedica peels have three steps and each step is matched with a different solution. The three different solutions that are applied to the face are the Prepping Solution (before), Peeling Solution (the peel) and Retinol Solution (after).

Afterward, you may have a yellowish tinge on your skin, which is expected to last no longer than 2 to 3 hours. You also may peel. People who use retinol regularly are less susceptible to peeling.

The treatment takes less than an hour (most are about 20 to 30 minutes) and you’ll enjoy very little social downtime afterward.

What should I do before my peel?

Avoid electrolysis, waxing depilatory creams and laser hair removal at least one week before a peel. Three days prior to your appointment avoid Retin-A, AHA, BHA, benzoyl peroxide, or any other products that may be drying or irritating.

One of our patients after a peel with Dr. Tim R. Love, MD, our clinical staff and SkinMedica representative.

One of our patients after a peel with Dr. Tim R. Love, MD, our clinical staff, and SkinMedica representative.

What should I do after my peel?

Avoid sun the day of your peel. If you must go outside, wear a hat. Use a gentle cleanser, a good moisturizer and sunscreen.  If you’re peeling, avoid picking at your skin and use a heavy moisturizer.

Also, Retin-A, facials, cosmetic injections, laser treatments and other procedures may be done only after the peeling process is completed.

Results are cumulative. Of course, you can do one skin peel as a special treat, but you’ll see better results if you have regularly scheduled appointments. Maximum benefits are seen with a series of three or more peels.

 

Are you ready to have more luminous skin? Our Oklahoma City office now offers skin peels! Contact us or call us today at 405.751.LOVE (5863) to schedule a skin peel.

100 Years of Hair: The Hairvolution From the 1900s to Now

When you’re looking at old photographs, what’s simultaneously going to make you cringe and be a dead-giveaway to what decade it is? That’s right: it’s all about the hair. From long and luscious locks to layered bobs, the past 100 years have seen it all. Just in time for a little Throwback Thursday, we’ve compiled a list of the most memorable hairstyles and what it took to achieve the look:

1920s1920s photo of woman with short hair

The 20s had a lot to roar about: shorter skirts, shorter hair, the right to vote, and a backfire on the alcohol ban. But this iconic decade did a lot more than inspire a legendary book (and now movie) called The Great Gatsby—it started a hairvolution. Starting with Louis Brook and dancer Irene Treman, the locks were cut into clean bobs with straight bangs—vastly different from the long, curled tresses of previous times.

1940s & 50s: 

group of 1940s women

Much in part to a certain film entitled Gone with the Wind, curled and half up was the defining hairstyle of the early 40s. Vivian Leigh’s Scarlett faded easily into the easy waves of Rita Hayworth’s “Old Hollywood” style. The cascading curls, often coiffed up away from the face, were an easy beauty trend that belied the work it took to get there.

1960s:

The 60s held a lot of changes in hairstyle and beauty—from the super-short bangs via Audrey Hepburn to the long locks often associated with the Hippie culture. Especially in the early 60s, when mod-inspired everything was just starting to come into trend, model Twiggy’s pixie was incredibly popular.

1970s:

women in the 1970s
from Flickr user Walter with CC BY-SA 2.0

At the beginning of the decade, the high-styled bouffant of Priscilla Presley was immensely popular—although tedious to recreate. For some, the pin-straight locks of Cher were easier to duplicate, although heartthrob Farah Fawcett stole the show when she arrived with feathered waves. The curled mane seemed effortless and beautiful, urging women everywhere to bug their salon stylist for a similar look.

1980s:

1980s hair
photo by Alan Light

In the 80s, bigger was always better—and that included hair. Laura Hutton’s voluminous, wavy mane certainly rocked the boat in the early half of the decade, although Jennifer Gray wasn’t about to let you put baby in the corner with her beautiful feathered ‘do. Icons like Madonna, Sarah Jessica Parker, and Cyndi Lauper also demonstrate that volume—paired with neon and leather—could really make a statement to last for centuries.

1990s:

the FRIENDS cast
from Flickr user lucianvenutian with CC BY-SA 2.0

Do we even have to mention it? FRIENDS star Jennifer Aniston’s “Rachel” cut—face-framing layers—swept the nation off its feet and right into the hair salon. Meg Ryan’s shag was also highly imitated, although women began to grow out their fabulously short ‘dos towards the mid-to-end of the 90s—the better to use those colorful scrunchies, of course!

2000s:

women with pink and blue hair in the 2000s
from Flickr user Stephanie Kroos with CC BY-SA 2.0

So far, in this century, we’ve experienced everything from bohemian-styled waves to half-shaved rocker hairstyles in every color. A few styles were so nice we saw them twice—blunt bangs, voluminous waves, poufs reminiscent of their bouffant parent. So what does the future look like? While The Hunger Games may have you considering bright colors and glitter, we think we’ll wait until then to see.

If you’d like to get ahead of the game and get your hair back, contact us–we’d love to help!

Almost as Cool as Time Travel: How Hair Transplant Surgery Works

man with bald head

You’re no Marty McFly, and time travel isn’t possible—for the most part. While we certainly don’t have a special DeLorean DMC-12 hiding out in our garage, we do have a few tips to get you back to the full head of hair you sported in the past. We can’t give away all of our secrets, but here’s the low-down on how hair transplant surgery works:

What is Hair Transplant Surgery?

Hair transplantation is a surgical technique that moves hair follicles from a healthy area on your scalp to a place that is balding or struggling to grow healthy strong hair. There are a variety of techniques that can be used to complete this, although most involve harvesting the natural hair follicle units, which typically grow in clumps of 1 to 4 follicles. This method is called Follicular Unit Transplantation (FUT), also known as strip harvesting; another method is called Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE), also known as the neo-graft method, in which the hair follicles are harvested individually before being placed. The FUE method is very time-consuming, however, and limits patient candidacy.

Too many acronyms? We made a video to simplify the explanation:

Let’s break down what Dr. Tim R. Love, MD is saying: essentially, we’re using your own hair to create a healthier hair pattern. We simply move some of the healthy hair you have to an area that is struggling. There’s no hair cloning because we’re not reviving dead hair follicles, and we’re definitely not able to create brand-new ones.

Hair transplant surgery can be used for the hair on your scalp, your eyebrows, your facial hair, or really any other hairy area you would like to see improved. Sometimes, balding is caused by an accident, previous surgery, or even genetic issues; whatever the reason, hair transplant surgery is typically an option. Under local anesthetic, the surgery may take a few hours to complete. Post-surgery, there will be a dressing applied to the transplant area to allow for healing. Most surgeons will recommend that you stay out of the sun and don’t start shampooing until a few days following the surgery.

Don’t panic: you may have hair fall out. The important thing is that your hair follicles do not fall out from scabbing, but instead from “shock loss.” Scabs will form from the surgery, shampooing can help fight against their formation, around the hair follicle, which may result in losing the progress. Shock loss, however, is only the hair—not the follicle—falling out following the trauma of the surgery.

Healthy new hair growth should begin three to nine months following the initial surgery. After a year post-op, you should be able to see a clear difference between your balding scalp and the new growth. You may need to follow up with medication to help prevent further loss or even a second follow-up surgery. Unfortunately, not every hair was created equally: to get a better idea of what you should expect, or to express any concerns you may have, contact us!

Almost as Cool as Time Travel: How Hair Transplant Surgery Works

man with bald head

You’re no Marty McFly, and time travel isn’t possible—for the most part. While we certainly don’t have a special DeLorean DMC-12 hiding out in our garage, we do have a few tips to get you back to the full head of hair you sported in the past. We can’t give away all of our secrets, but here’s the low-down on how hair transplant surgery works:

What is Hair Transplant Surgery?

Hair transplantation is a surgical technique that moves hair follicles from a healthy area on your scalp to a place that is balding or struggling to grow healthy strong hair. There are a variety of techniques that can be used to complete this, although most involve harvesting the natural hair follicle units, which typically grow in clumps of 1 to 4 follicles. This method is called Follicular Unit Transplantation (FUT), also known as strip harvesting; another method is called Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE), also known as the neo-graft method, in which the hair follicles are harvested individually before being placed. The FUE method is very time-consuming, however, and limits patient candidacy.

Too many acronyms? We made a video to simplify the explanation:

Let’s break down what Dr. Tim R. Love, MD is saying: essentially, we’re using your own hair to create a healthier hair pattern. We simply move some of the healthy hair you have to an area that is struggling. There’s no hair cloning because we’re not reviving dead hair follicles, and we’re definitely not able to create brand-new ones.

Hair transplant surgery can be used for the hair on your scalp, your eyebrows, your facial hair, or really any other hairy area you would like to see improved. Sometimes, balding is caused by an accident, previous surgery, or even genetic issues; whatever the reason, hair transplant surgery is typically an option. Under local anesthetic, the surgery may take a few hours to complete. Post-surgery, there will be a dressing applied to the transplant area to allow for healing. Most surgeons will recommend that you stay out of the sun and don’t start shampooing until a few days following the surgery.

Don’t panic: you may have hair fall out. The important thing is that your hair follicles do not fall out from scabbing, but instead from “shock loss.” Scabs will form from the surgery, shampooing can help fight against their formation, around the hair follicle, which may result in losing the progress. Shock loss, however, is only the hair—not the follicle—falling out following the trauma of the surgery.

Healthy new hair growth should begin three to nine months following the initial surgery. After a year post-op, you should be able to see a clear difference between your balding scalp and the new growth. You may need to follow up with medication to help prevent further loss or even a second follow-up surgery. Unfortunately, not every hair was created equally: to get a better idea of what you should expect, or to express any concerns you may have, contact us!