Keeping Your Hair Healthy After a Hair Transplant

healthy HAIR after a hair transplant Procedure

Hair follicles are the starting point for your hair growth. Follicles are glands at the top of the scalp that hold the only living part of your hair; the hair that you see on your head is not growing, and is actually considered “dead.”

We lose about 100 hairs a day, but new hair is constantly growing, so it is barely noticeable. Hair loss or balding occurs when the normal cycle of hair growth and shedding is disrupted due to stress, hormones, or other factors, or if the hair follicle is damaged or destroyed and replaced by scar tissue.

Hair thinning, hair loss, and baldness can be significant challenges for many people, both men and women. While some try to manage it on their own, many other people will pursue some type of hair restoration, such as medication.

Hair transplant procedures are also growing in popularity as an option for halting or even reversing hair loss. More than 100,000 hair restoration procedures are performed each year in the US alone, and that number continues to grow.

During a hair transplant, small groups of healthy hair follicles—called grafts—are removed from one part of the scalp—a “donor site”—and transplanted to the area of thinning or balding. Though this transplanted hair will fall out within a few weeks of the surgery—remember, the hair itself is dead, but the transplanted follicles are “alive” and healthy—new hair growth will begin in that area soon after.

If you have recently undergone a hair transplant or other type of surgical hair restoration procedure, taking care of your hair is now more important than ever. While hair thinning, hair loss, and baldness are heavily influenced by genetics, there are some steps you can take to help care for what you do have.

Haircare after a hair transplant procedure

Taking care of your hair helps prevent oil buildup, breakage, and split ends, which can weaken the hair. The ideal hair care routine varies with every individual, but some basics can help keep your hair—whatever its personality—healthy.

  • Less is more, especially when it comes to your shampoo. Although it’s designed to clean your hair, too much can strip your hair of the natural oils and minerals that keep it healthy and shiny. Many hair experts even discourage daily shampoo, suggesting you instead opt for an all-natural dry shampoo. You also want to avoid shampoos with excessive chemicals or fragrance. Look for products free of sulfates, parabens, dyes, GMOs, and mineral oils. These ingredients can dry out your hair, and cause buildup that dulls the shine.
  • Be gentle with wet hair, as it’s far more fragile than dry hair. Instead of using a harsh cotton towel to dry your hair, opt for an old t-shirt. Try to comb and detangle your hair before you wash it, and use a wide-toothed comb when you still have conditioner in your hair.
  • Beat the heat, as much as you can. While completely cutting out heat treatments may not be possible, limiting them is best. Invest in a hairdryer that has a cooling option, or a straightener that works without being over 300 degrees. Heat-protective products are also recommended.
  • A softer style works for your hair better than harsh up-dos. Loosen ponytails, braids, and any other hairstyle that puts a little stress on your roots. Additionally, try to limit products that make your hair too stiff or too big and opt instead for a little texture.
  • See your stylist regularly to trim split ends. Cutting off those dead ends every six to eight weeks promotes healthier, faster hair growth.

A healthy diet can help keep your hair healthy after a hair transplant procedure

There are a variety of foods that you can incorporate into a healthy diet that will help give your hair the nutrients it needs to grow full and healthy. Some of these foods include:

  • Fish, such as salmon, tuna, or trout, are rich in protein and Vitamin D, as well as omega-3 fatty acids
  • Walnuts are also rich in fatty acids, biotin, and vitamin E which help protect your hair against damage.
  • Eggs, in addition to protein, have zinc, selenium, sulfur, and iron, which carries oxygen to your hair follicles.
  • Blueberries are abundant in vitamin C, which is critical for circulation to the scalp.
  • Spinach has beta carotene, folate, and vitamin C—all of which benefit scalp oils.

Other factors that can help keep your hair healthy after a hair transplant procedure:

Sometimes, hair damage and loss can be attributed simply to age or other genetic factors; other times, it’s a result of daily habits. If you’re eating right but still having trouble with your locks, you may want to have your vitamin and mineral levels checked and take supplements as recommended by your doctor.

In addition to limiting product use, try to choose silicone-based products to limit the amount of damage done to your hair. Leave-in conditioners are also excellent for protecting hair and don’t forget about following the product directions precisely. Finally, be sure you trust your hairstylist—whether it’s a cut or a styling, they shouldn’t be hurting your scalp by doing their job.

Dr. Tim R. Love is a board-certified plastic surgeon with more than 30 years of experience in hair restoration procedures. He has worked closely with pioneers in the hair transplant field and continues to remain at the forefront of the latest innovations in transplant technology and techniques.

If you have questions about your hair transplant or think you may be a good candidate to receive this hair transplant procedure, call our office today at (405) 751-LOVE (5683) or contact us to schedule a consultation.

NeoGraft vs. Strip Method: Which Hair Transplant Method is Better?

NeoGraft vs. Strip Method: What is the best hair transplant procedure?

Thinning hair and hair loss affect millions of people, regardless of age or sex. Thinning hair and premature balding, which is heavily influenced by genetic and hereditary characteristics, can lead to low self-esteem and self-confidence. However, hair loss does not have to be permanent, and, in many cases, can even be reversed.
Technological advancements in the areas of hair transplant and restoration offer an alternative to the embarrassment of early hair loss. Two of the most common methods for hair transplants are the traditional strip harvesting technique and the newer NeoGraft® technique. But which is the best hair transplant procedure?

The Different METHODS of hair replacement

Strip method: The traditional strip harvesting technique, known as Follicular Unit Transplant (FUT), involves removing the follicular units from the donor area as one group. The strip method allows the follicular units to be extracted intact, in their genetic form. Each follicular unit contains 1 to 4 hairs (the average is 2.2 hairs per follicular unit). The strip method requires expert surgical skill so the patient will achieve the best result while causing the least trauma to the donor site. It also allows healthy hair to harvest faster.
NeoGraft® method: The newer NeoGraft® method automates the Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) procedure. The NeoGraft® method takes the hair out from the donor area with a cookie-cutter looking punch knife that has a diameter of approximately 1mm. This tool is inserted around one hair or a group of hairs known as a follicular unit. The tool makes a short, quick, rotational spin on the scalp to extract the hair follicle. This is done blindly, since the surgeon cannot see the root of the hair while inserting the tool into the scalp.

PROVEN Hair transplant procedures VS. NEW AND TRENDY

Strip method of hair transplants:

The strip method has a proven track record of success and provides natural looking permanent results.
NeoGraft® method: The NeoGraft® method is a newer and less proven procedure, often with increased surgical time, lower precision, and a higher cost to the patient.

AFFORDABILITY of the strip method of hair transplants

Strip method hair transplant costs: On average, the strip method cost $4 per graft.
NeoGraft® method hair transplant costs: On average, the cost is $4-6 per graft.
The average patient requires approximately 1,500 grafts.

Hair GRAFT QUALITY

Strip method hair transplant quality: Since the hair strip is taken out in a surgical suite with a well-positioned and visible surgical field and magnification, the strip method creates quality grafts with the best viability. This allows the surgeon to precisely remove the necessary follicles intact, which avoids trauma and the likelihood of cutting across and destroying hair follicles.
NeoGraft® method hair transplant quality: Graft quality is not as good compared to the strip method because the surgeon assumes that the direction of the punch knife and the hair shaft are the same and that the knife will not cut the hair across and damage it. The hair’s roots may change direction slightly as they are buried in the skin so the chance of cutting across the roots while taking them out is increased.

HAIR SELECTION

Strip method hair selection: The strip method makes it possible to choose the best donor hair. By taking out donor hair from the back of the head, which never grows completely bald in most people, the donor hair is resistant to the damaging effects of testosterone. The testosterone hormone is responsible for genetic hair loss. This healthy donor hair doesn’t care about its new location and stays in place since their genetic material makes them more resistant to hair loss.
NeoGraft® method hair selection: Donor hair is often taken from the broader section of the skull, and theoretically, even elsewhere on the body. Variety does not translate into quality since randomly chosen hair is not necessarily more resistant to hair loss.

POST Hair Transplant SURGERY HAIR STYLE

Strip method : While it takes a few days for the incision at the donor site to heal, the surrounding hair is not affected by the strip method. No haircut or change in styling is needed.
NeoGraft® method: In large hair transplant sessions, the entire donor area must be shaved to access the follicles. You may need to sport a new hairstyle for a while.

Visit our post about swimming after hair transplants. 

Hair Transplant Procedure SCARRING

Strip method scarring: The small linear incision resulting from the harvesting is usually covered by your hair. During subsequent procedures, the first scar is completely removed. With the strip method, the patient is left with only one incision, regardless of the number of procedures.
NeoGraft® method scarring: If the first NeoGraft® session requires 2,000 grafts, you’ll have 2,000 tiny round scars. If there are follow-up procedures this number will double, triple, and so on. With each subsequent session, the scarring with the NeoGraft® method increases. Moreover, if genetic hair loss continues or you happen to require several procedures, thousands of fine scars may become visible in the thinning donor area.

NEED HELP DECIDING which hair transplant procedure is right for you?

For more than 30 years, Dr. Tim R. Love has been on the cutting edge of hair transplant procedures for men and hair transplant procedures for women, working with some of the field’s most prominent experts and serving as a member of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery. Dr. Love provides a caring and compassionate approach to hair restoration, and is committed to delivering flattering, long-lasting, and natural-looking results. Don’t spend another day hiding your hair loss. Call us today at (405) 751-LOVE (5683) or contact us to schedule an initial consultation and find out if hair transplants are right for you.

Dr. Tim R. Love, MD briefly explains FUE vs FUT donor sites. Hair transplant donors don’t have hair to waste, see the results from one of Dr. Tim R. Love, MD’s patients in the video above. Click here to learn more about hair transplants in OKC.

100 Years of Hair: The Hairvolution From the 1900s to Now

When you’re looking at old photographs, what’s simultaneously going to make you cringe and be a dead-giveaway to what decade it is? That’s right: it’s all about the hair. From long and luscious locks to layered bobs, the past 100 years have seen it all. Just in time for a little Throwback Thursday, we’ve compiled a list of the most memorable hairstyles and what it took to achieve the look:

1920s1920s photo of woman with short hair

The 20s had a lot to roar about: shorter skirts, shorter hair, the right to vote, and a backfire on the alcohol ban. But this iconic decade did a lot more than inspire a legendary book (and now movie) called The Great Gatsby—it started a hairvolution. Starting with Louis Brook and dancer Irene Treman, the locks were cut into clean bobs with straight bangs—vastly different from the long, curled tresses of previous times.

1940s & 50s: 

group of 1940s women

Much in part to a certain film entitled Gone with the Wind, curled and half up was the defining hairstyle of the early 40s. Vivian Leigh’s Scarlett faded easily into the easy waves of Rita Hayworth’s “Old Hollywood” style. The cascading curls, often coiffed up away from the face, were an easy beauty trend that belied the work it took to get there.

1960s:

The 60s held a lot of changes in hairstyle and beauty—from the super-short bangs via Audrey Hepburn to the long locks often associated with the Hippie culture. Especially in the early 60s, when mod-inspired everything was just starting to come into trend, model Twiggy’s pixie was incredibly popular.

1970s:

women in the 1970s
from Flickr user Walter with CC BY-SA 2.0

At the beginning of the decade, the high-styled bouffant of Priscilla Presley was immensely popular—although tedious to recreate. For some, the pin-straight locks of Cher were easier to duplicate, although heartthrob Farah Fawcett stole the show when she arrived with feathered waves. The curled mane seemed effortless and beautiful, urging women everywhere to bug their salon stylist for a similar look.

1980s:

1980s hair
photo by Alan Light

In the 80s, bigger was always better—and that included hair. Laura Hutton’s voluminous, wavy mane certainly rocked the boat in the early half of the decade, although Jennifer Gray wasn’t about to let you put baby in the corner with her beautiful feathered ‘do. Icons like Madonna, Sarah Jessica Parker, and Cyndi Lauper also demonstrate that volume—paired with neon and leather—could really make a statement to last for centuries.

1990s:

the FRIENDS cast
from Flickr user lucianvenutian with CC BY-SA 2.0

Do we even have to mention it? FRIENDS star Jennifer Aniston’s “Rachel” cut—face-framing layers—swept the nation off its feet and right into the hair salon. Meg Ryan’s shag was also highly imitated, although women began to grow out their fabulously short ‘dos towards the mid-to-end of the 90s—the better to use those colorful scrunchies, of course!

2000s:

women with pink and blue hair in the 2000s
from Flickr user Stephanie Kroos with CC BY-SA 2.0

So far, in this century, we’ve experienced everything from bohemian-styled waves to half-shaved rocker hairstyles in every color. A few styles were so nice we saw them twice—blunt bangs, voluminous waves, poufs reminiscent of their bouffant parent. So what does the future look like? While The Hunger Games may have you considering bright colors and glitter, we think we’ll wait until then to see.

If you’d like to get ahead of the game and get your hair back, contact us–we’d love to help!

100 Years of Hair: The Hairvolution From the 1900s to Now

When you’re looking at old photographs, what’s simultaneously going to make you cringe and be a dead-giveaway to what decade it is? That’s right: it’s all about the hair. From long and luscious locks to layered bobs, the past 100 years have seen it all. Just in time for a little Throwback Thursday, we’ve compiled a list of the most memorable hairstyles and what it took to achieve the look:

1920s1920s photo of woman with short hair

The 20s had a lot to roar about: shorter skirts, shorter hair, the right to vote, and a backfire on the alcohol ban. But this iconic decade did a lot more than inspire a legendary book (and now movie) called The Great Gatsby—it started a hairvolution. Starting with Louis Brook and dancer Irene Treman, the locks were cut into clean bobs with straight bangs—vastly different from the long, curled tresses of previous times.

1940s & 50s: 

group of 1940s women

Much in part to a certain film entitled Gone with the Wind, curled and half up was the defining hairstyle of the early 40s. Vivian Leigh’s Scarlett faded easily into the easy waves of Rita Hayworth’s “Old Hollywood” style. The cascading curls, often coiffed up away from the face, were an easy beauty trend that belied the work it took to get there.

1960s:

The 60s held a lot of changes in hairstyle and beauty—from the super-short bangs via Audrey Hepburn to the long locks often associated with the Hippie culture. Especially in the early 60s, when mod-inspired everything was just starting to come into trend, model Twiggy’s pixie was incredibly popular.

1970s:

women in the 1970s
from Flickr user Walter with CC BY-SA 2.0

At the beginning of the decade, the high-styled bouffant of Priscilla Presley was immensely popular—although tedious to recreate. For some, the pin-straight locks of Cher were easier to duplicate, although heartthrob Farah Fawcett stole the show when she arrived with feathered waves. The curled mane seemed effortless and beautiful, urging women everywhere to bug their salon stylist for a similar look.

1980s:

1980s hair
photo by Alan Light

In the 80s, bigger was always better—and that included hair. Laura Hutton’s voluminous, wavy mane certainly rocked the boat in the early half of the decade, although Jennifer Gray wasn’t about to let you put baby in the corner with her beautiful feathered ‘do. Icons like Madonna, Sarah Jessica Parker, and Cyndi Lauper also demonstrate that volume—paired with neon and leather—could really make a statement to last for centuries.

1990s:

the FRIENDS cast
from Flickr user lucianvenutian with CC BY-SA 2.0

Do we even have to mention it? FRIENDS star Jennifer Aniston’s “Rachel” cut—face-framing layers—swept the nation off its feet and right into the hair salon. Meg Ryan’s shag was also highly imitated, although women began to grow out their fabulously short ‘dos towards the mid-to-end of the 90s—the better to use those colorful scrunchies, of course!

2000s:

women with pink and blue hair in the 2000s
from Flickr user Stephanie Kroos with CC BY-SA 2.0

So far, in this century, we’ve experienced everything from bohemian-styled waves to half-shaved rocker hairstyles in every color. A few styles were so nice we saw them twice—blunt bangs, voluminous waves, poufs reminiscent of their bouffant parent. So what does the future look like? While The Hunger Games may have you considering bright colors and glitter, we think we’ll wait until then to see.

If you’d like to get ahead of the game and get your hair back, contact us–we’d love to help!